MGM works to combat human trafficking

MGM hosting an anti trafficking presentation

MGM hosting an anti trafficking presentation

MGM China has been working to combat human trafficking.

MGM has provided detailed training on the issue to all senior management, provided by the Human Trafficking Deterrent Measures Concern Committee, to understand the important initiatives underway in the Macau community to drive prevention and awareness.

Additionally, as frontline employees of any potential case, all security staff have taken part in comprehensive training to understand touchpoints where human trafficking might occur, as well as how to act.

“Human trafficking”, “trafficking in persons” and “modern-day slavery” are terms to describe the acquisition of people by improper means such as force, fraud or deception, with the aim of exploiting them. It is sadly a global phenomenon, with illegal profits estimated to be $150 billion per year, according to the International Labour Organization (ILO), a specialised agency of the United Nations. Furthermore, in a 2012 report, the ILO estimates that almost 21 million people are in forced labour, including 5.5 million children and 4.4 million in forced sexual exploitation.

The hospitality industry can play an important role in the fight against human trafficking. In recent years, MGM has been working to bring the issue to wider attention, and to collaborate and partner for greater impact.

Sarah Rogers, Senior Vice President of Strategy and Corporate Responsibility at MGM China said, “At MGM, we understand that eradicating human trafficking is a complex process that can only be achieved through constructive partnerships at all levels, worldwide. From our company position statement, made available to all employees on our employee intranet, to a dedicated module on anti-human trafficking in new hire orientation training, all employees at MGM are made aware of the problem, and how to act.”

MGM has sought to encourage industry-wide action, as well as provide platforms for discussion and knowledge sharing. In March 2016, MGM China was the first private sector company in Macau to hold a seminar dedicated to combatting human trafficking within the hospitality industry, including local hotels, operators and other community partners. Facilitated by the Mekong Club, a non-profit organisation that aims to harness the skills of the private sector to fight against human trafficking, the seminar focused attentions on the direct actions the hospitality sector can take through its operational and supply chain activities. This was the second of a roundtable forum series sponsored by MGM, with the first, “Business Leadership to End Human Trafficking & Modern Day Slavery”, being held in 2015, in partnership with the Macau Good Shepherd Center and VITAL Voices USA, two leading associations dedicated to ending humans rights abuses internationally.

In collaboration with the Good Shepherd Center, MGM China also sponsored a public screening of “Not My Life”, a harrowing documentary exposing viewers to a world where millions of children worldwide are being exploited and forced to live in modern day slavery. MGM also made this eye-opening documentary available to all staff.

In addition to partnering with non-profit organisations, MGM China engages with public sector entities such as the Legal Affairs Bureau, the Office of the Secretary for Security, Social Welfare Bureau, the Judiciary Police, as well as the Human Trafficking Deterrent Measures Concern Committee (an interdepartmental government body with cross-cutting policy areas) to further shared objectives of zero tolerance for human trafficking in Macau.

You can learn more about MGM’s position statement against human trafficking on the sustainability section of their corporate website: http://www.mgmchinaholdings.com/.

In addition, ITP works with fourteen leading hotel groups on human rights including to tackle and raise awareness of the human trafficking risk, and publishing our position statement.

We have a free downloadable Know How Guide on Human Trafficking.

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